Overweight? Pollution may be partially to blame

Overweight? Pollution may be partially to blame

 

Pollutants are everywhere, and people are often unaware of how these toxins are affecting their health until they have already developed problems. This is why people should be proactive and use organic detox products to help protect themselves from the effects of pollution. It's especially important to shield children from toxins whenever possible, since their developing bodies may be more susceptible to toxins. Recently, scientists from Duke University found that exposure to high levels of pollution in the womb may be associated with excess body fat in the future.

"It is becoming clearer that our environment profoundly affects our health in ways that are little understood," said researcher Jessica Bolton, Ph.D. "We believe these data have important implications for health disparities as a consequence of socioeconomic conditions, in which low income neighborhoods tend to be disproportionately exposed to high levels of pollution."

Scientists came to their conclusions after examining two groups of pregnant mice, one of which was exposed to diesel exhaust during the second half of their pregnancy, and another that served as a control group. Once the mice gave birth and their offspring matured, they were placed on either a low-fat or high-fat diet. At the end of six weeks, males born to moms that were exposed to pollution during pregnancy were heavier than those that were not born amongst high levels of pollutants, regardless of which diet they were on.

According to the researchers, these findings should discourage pregnant women from opening their car windows during long drives to work, to avoid the amount of diesel fuel they are exposed to. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that one-third of Americans carry excess weight, and these findings suggest that pollution may be one factor influencing the waistlines of U.S. residents.